Six days of exploring Limburg by cycle with @florianne 🚴‍♀️❤️🚴‍♂️

Aye aye aye, bad omen for our three day in Limburg this weekend. Let's hope it holds. @florianne

thank everyone that followed my adventure. I hope it may inspire your next adventure. Love, Floris. (2/2)

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🇧🇪🇯🇵 On February 14th I left home on two wheels heading for Tokyo. Yesterday my dream came to fruition after what has been the adventure of a lifetime. Many thanks to all the kind strangers and friends that crossed my path along the way. May I one day return the favor. I would also like to thank everyone that supported my world bicycle relief campaign. Together we made a significant and lasting impact on the lives of thirty-five children in rural Sub-Saharan Africa. Finally, I'd like to (1/2)

their bikes. Which has led resulted in numerous photos 🙂. It hasn't been the most adventurous touring, but it's nonetheless been very enjoyable. I'm now taking a rest day in Daegu (not that the cycling has been very tiring!), the third largest city in South Korea. Tomorrow I'm continuing south towards the port city of Busan. Annyeonghasaeyo! (4/4)

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point on the path (530ish m), met a few friendly dogs, cats and other cyclists and been enjoying the midday warmth. It does cool down during the night and most mornings are misty. Cycling here is very different from China, with purpose build cycle paths far away from traffic. The infrastructure with public toilets and rest areas is the best I've ever seen anywhere. Camping has been a breeze as well. All of this makes cycling very accessible, as evident by the large number of Koreans on (3/4)

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great time. The next day I set off to visit Seoul, hiking the old city wall, counting the number of cafes (seriously, coffee is big business here) and visiting a number of palaces and the Jongmyo shrine. These are places of sanctuary right in the middle of a sprawling city. It was also interesting to see the importance of the spirit world in Korean mythology. After Seoul I followed the Hangang south towards the heart of the southern peninsula. Along the way I passed along the highest (2/4)

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South Korea - four rivers trail. After the ferry from China, I set off from Incheon for a short ride to Seoul. It was a sunny day and it was great to see all the recreational cyclists out and about. It reminded me of a mild spring Sunday morning along de schelde back home. I even rode in a pace line for a while. In Seoul I was hosted by Jo Anna and her husband in their traditional Korean home with two cats 🐱. She'd invited some friends over and we got to share stories, food and drink: a (1/4)

about drinks: mark December 20th in your calendars as I'll be inviting all my supporters for a chat and drink back home 🥂More info to follow soon! Love, Floris (4/4)

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communicate with local people. Overall, I'm very grateful though that I've been able to catch a glimpse of the diverse and exotic cultures in China. As for the rest of my trip: on Friday I'm crossing the yellow sea by ferry to Incheon, South Korea. But first I'm spending my last days in China exploring Qingdao. Its brief occupation by Germany at the beginning of the previous century makes it an interesting place in China. Even more so as it is the hometown of the Tsingtao beer 🍺 Talking (3/4)

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straightforward in the (populated) east and the food was tasty! On the other hand, my route after Xi'an quickly became monotonous and was often filled with trucks. This combined with the large distances made cycling feel like a chore. Fortunately, podcasts provided some distraction (thanks Sam Harris!) and helped to drown out the excessive honking from other road users (really, it's crazy). One other unexpected difficulty was the feeling of isolation as it's really challenging to (2/4)

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China - the yellow sea. Fifty five days and 4 500km after entering China, I reached the shores of the yellow sea in Qingdao! A huge milestone as China was a big challenge due to its sheer size and visa limits. While it's still early to reflect, China did surprise me in a number of ways. For one, it's much more developed than I anticipated. Secondly, the road conditions were the best of my entire trip so far and the highspeed rail is an engineering marvel. Also camping was fairly (1/4)

LHT. Unfortunately my bicycle was stolen some time later, but I'm still using the same panniers! A fun weekend that led to many more trips and a great reminder that you don't have to go far for adventure! #2012 (2/2)

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Throwback to October 27 2012 when Lasse, Sander and I set off for an overnighter in the south of Belgium on what was to be my first taste of bicycle touring! The hoge venen is the largest nature reserve in Belgium and it has been the backdrop to many of our outdoor adventures. I remember that at one point my rear rack came loose and dragged behind my bicycle for a while. Luckily we managed to fix it somehow. Sander was riding Lasse's old mountainbike and Lasse was on the classic Surely (1/2)

😁) and sharing the result over wechat! By way of a parting gift, they offered me a large pot of yakh yoghurt: a very delicious snack! Feeling grateful for this encounter, I set off in the midday sun to ride another day (4/4)

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Buddhist shrines: stupas, statues, murals and prayer flags lining the roads. I left the valley towards Tongren in favour of a road through the mountains to Guashize monastery. While exploring the monastery buildings I was ushered over by two young monks. From translating with the phone I found out that they were born in Tongren but came to the monastery at the age of sixteen, where they have now been for two years. This was followed by an impromptu photoshoot (I have a dozen more photos (3/4)

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morning most of my water had frozen overnight. Fortunately there was a three hour climb waiting to warm up 😅. In such cold weather it's critical to regulate body temperature, as too much sweating will leave you shivering in the descent. Still, you can see me with most of my clothes on ready for the descent in the fourth picture. I zoomed through Xining, the capital of Qinghai province, eager to get to the Buddhist valleys to the south. The way to Tongren was filled with numerous (2/4)

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China - Qinghai. Cycling south from Zhangye, I entered a new province: Qinghai. Here on the edge of the Tibetan plateau you get a sense of the Tibetan culture and Buddhism without actually having to go to Tibet (which involves an expensive permit). The camel caravan sculptures reminded me that after eight months of cycling, I'm still following the silk road. Eleanor and I had to part ways at this point, as I had to get a move on with my sixty day visa. The weather took a cold turn: one (1/4)

meant a prime view the next morning. Unfortunately the infrared light of the night cameras interfered with my night photography, so no star filled skies this time. (3/3)

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